My own entry for Draw A Bird Day 2014: A Blue Jay.

bazzelwaki:

Draw a Bird Day: Marsh Wren

Drawn for ejbarnes, for Draw A Bird Day!

Would you like me to draw you something? Would you like to Help my move to Chicago? Click to find out how!

This is the commission I ordered from B. Prager, which got drawn today — Draw A Bird Day.

(Reblogged from bazzelwaki)

Was experimenting recently with defining panel borders (including dream sequences and flashbacks) solely using watercolors, for the current revision of Spirits & Seekers: Cagliostro in Courland. My test images (3 of the 6 are shown here) are all based on the 1784 portrait of Elisa von der Recke by Joseph Friedrich August Darbes (bottom). Elisa was the author of Account of the notorious Cagliostro’s sojourn in Mitau in 1779, and his magical operations there (1787), and is a major character in my graphic novel Spirits & Seekers.

Last night’s BCR meeting was clothed figure drawing where we posed for each other. Last pose of the evening: writer Lindsay Moore crooning into the “mike”.

Last night’s BCR meeting was clothed figure drawing where we posed for each other. Last pose of the evening: writer Lindsay Moore crooning into the “mike”.

Ads I don’t want to see on Tumblr

Any advice from my fellow Tumblrs would be appreciated: I’ve been seeing video ads for Olay in my Tumblr feed and in my sidebar for days if not weeks now. Is there some way to get rid of them? I can’t find any icons (like the ones in Facebook) that say “Get rid of this ad.”

sfcartoonartmuseum:

beatonna:

The Hortus Deliciarum is a pictorial encyclopedia, possibly the first of that type book compiled by a lady.  For more about the Abbess Herrad of Landsberg, click through the picture!  

Given how these were meant to be read (do click through to read more — it’s fascinating!), one could easily argue that this is a comic.

Decades ago, I was told that cathedral art — stained glass, sculpture, and the like — were for the benefit of the illiterate masses who were herded into the churches all over Europe.

Going on to read about alchemical symbolism and other works on esoteric symbols in art, I soon realized there was more, much more to it than that. At least for those who could look for the right signs. The famous rose windows of Chartres and elsewhere are unquestionably mandalas.

This helps explain one of the many ways that Freemasonry grew out of practical (“operative”) masonry. The skilled laborers who build the great cathedrals of mediaeval and Renaissance Europe were not only literate in the mathematical arts necessary for such a grand project (especially one that took three to five generations to build), but in the symbolism that was being embedded in the work.

The above image, arranged in a pattern similar to the cathedral rose windows, represents the Seven Liberal Arts (female figures all). I would argue that this is not a comic (as it is not necessary to read the items in sequence) but a chart.

(Reblogged from spx)